Title

National trends in hospital readmission following transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary lesions.

Department

Neurosurgery

Document Type

Article

Abstract

PURPOSE: Several institutions recently published their experiences with unplanned readmissions rates after transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary lesions. Readmission rates on a national level, however, have not been explored in depth. We investigated nationwide trends in this procedure and associated independent predictors, costs, and causes of 30-day readmission.

METHODS: The Nationwide Readmissions Database was queried to identify patients 18 and older who underwent transsphenoidal surgery for pituitary lesion resection (2010-2015). National trends and statistical variances were calculated based on weighted, clustered, and stratified sample means.

RESULTS: Of the weighted total of 44,759 patients treated over the 6-year period, 4658 (10.4%) were readmitted within 30 days. Readmission rates did not change across the survey period (P = 0.71). Patients readmitted had a higher prevalence of comorbidities than those not readmitted (82.5% vs. 78.4%, respectively, P < 0.001), experienced more postoperative complications (47.2% vs. 31.8%, P < 0.001), and had a longer length of stay (6.59 vs. 4.23 days, P < 0.001) during index admission. The most common causes for readmission were SIADH (17.5%) and other hyponatremia (16.4%). Average total readmission cost was $12,080 with no significant trend across the study period (P = 0.25). Predictors for readmission identified included diabetes mellitus, psychological disorders, renal failure, and experiencing diabetes insipidus during the index admission.

CONCLUSION: Unplanned readmission is an important quality metric. While transsphenoidal pituitary surgery is a relatively safe procedure, 30-day readmission rates and costs have not declined. Future studies on institutional protocols targeting these identified predictors to prevent readmission are necessary to decrease readmission rates on a national scale.

Publication Date

4-1-2020

Publication Title

Pituitary

ISSN

1573-7403

Volume

23

Issue

2

First Page

79

Last Page

91

PubMed ID

31728907

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1007/s11102-019-01007-0

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