Title

Multiple Subpial Transections in Eloquent Cortex for Refractory Epilepsy: 2-Dimensional Operative Video.

Department

Neurosurgery

Document Type

Article

Abstract

Although the epilepsy refractory to medical therapy can potentially be cured by the resection of epileptogenic tissue, many patients do not qualify for surgery, because epileptogenic tissue can arise from eloquent areas of the brain, where surgical resection would result in severe neurological deficits. Palliative surgical treatments currently used in these situations include deep brain stimulation, responsive neurostimulation, and vagal nerve stimulation.1 A previously developed technique, multiple subpial transections (MSTs), although used infrequently, is another effective tool.2 Our patient, a 34-yr-old man, had epilepsy that was refractory to medical management. His preoperative work-up demonstrated a potential seizure focus in the left pars opercularis and left superior temporal gyrus, which was verified using invasive stereoelectroencephalography. Functional magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a significant verbal and motor function in this region. After informed consent was obtained, the patient underwent a left-sided craniotomy. The central portion of the seizure focus was resected using the subpial technique. The surrounding presumed epileptogenic cortex, which was considered functionally eloquent, was then horizontally disconnected with MSTs. For each transection, a small puncture incision was made in the pia, and a vertical cut was completed using Morrell dissectors.2 MSTs were performed circumferentially around the entire resection cavity in 5-mm increments. All hemostasis was achieved with irrigation instead of electrocautery, although noncauterizing hemostatic agents are also acceptable. The patient was neurologically intact after the operation and was discharged home on postoperative day 2. He was free of seizures at 11-month follow-up. Used with permission from Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, Arizona.

Publication Date

8-1-2020

Publication Title

Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown)

ISSN

2332-4260

Volume

19

Issue

2

First Page

167

Last Page

167

PubMed ID

31777942

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1093/ons/opz318

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