Title

Two-Stage Revascularization and Clip Reconstruction of a Giant Ophthalmic Artery Aneurysm: 3-Dimensional Operative Video.

Department

Neurosurgery

Document Type

Article

Abstract

Ophthalmic segment aneurysms (OSAs) are technically challenging lesions with a wide-neck morphology and proximity to the optic nerve. Revascularization and aneurysm trapping are occasionally needed to manage unclippable OSAs. Microsurgical treatment requires anterior clinoidectomy, optic strut drilling, and proximal/distal dural ring dissection for adequate exposure. This video demonstrates a two-stage revascularization and clip reconstruction of an OSA. A 62-yr-old woman was presented, with acute-onset expressive aphasia, right hemineglect, and hemiparesis. Neuroimaging revealed a partially thrombosed giant OSA measuring 2.5 × 2.3 cm2. Patient consent was obtained for bypassing, trapping, and decompressing the aneurysm. A pterional craniotomy was performed and an external carotid artery - radial artery graft - middle cerebral artery bypass was performed. The aneurysm was proximally occluded with a permanent clip on the clinoidal internal carotid artery (ICA). Adherence of the distal supraclinoid ICA to the aneurysm wall did not allow for aneurysm trapping. On postoperative day 8, the patient experienced acute mental status decline due to a frontal intraparenchymal hemorrhage. The aneurysm was trapped in a second surgery to occlude persistent retrograde aneurysm filling. The aneurysm sac was circumferentially dissected with temporary parent artery trapping. The OSA was opened and thrombectomized using an ultrasonic aspirator followed by trapping clip application. Postoperatively, the patient gradually returned to neurological baseline with minimal expressive aphasia. Although OSAs are preferentially treated with flow diversion, giant OSAs with significant mass effect may necessitate microsurgical clipping or trapping with decompressive thrombectomy. This case demonstrates that proximal clip occlusion may not be sufficient for aneurysm thrombosis and rupture prevention. Used with permission from Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, Arizona.

Publication Date

9-1-2019

Publication Title

Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown)

ISSN

2332-4260

Volume

17

Issue

3

First Page

110

Last Page

110

PubMed ID

30576540

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1093/ons/opy383

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