Title

Comparative Analysis of Continuous Suturing, Interrupted Suturing, and Cyanoacrylate-Based Lid Techniques for End-to-End Microvascular Anastomosis: Laboratory Investigation.

Department

Neurosurgery

Document Type

Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Mastery of the microsurgical anastomosis is an indispensable component of neurosurgical training. However, in many resource-limited countries, the training, materials, and equipment to obtain these surgical and decision making skills are severely lacking. This study aimed to compare different suturing techniques for microvascular anastomosis and to complete a comparative assessment of the performance of a young neurosurgeon when using the various techniques.

METHODS: We compared 3 end-to-end suturing techniques for microvascular anastomosis: interrupted suturing, continuous suturing, and a 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate-based lid technique using an umbilical artery model. We assessed the subjective difficulty of the suturing technique, the time needed to perform the procedure, and the flow rate and leakage of the vessel after each technique. This study was designed to use materials that would be available in developing countries. Surgical apparatus used, such as operating microscopes, were first-generation technology, and testing procedures were designed for neurosurgical residents in developing countries.

RESULTS: The mean times to complete the anastomosis were 20.7 ± 7.7 minutes for the interrupted technique, 26.4 ± 7.7 minutes for the continuous technique, and 12.5 ± 2.5 minutes for the lid technique; these values were significantly different (P < 0.01). The differences among the 3 techniques in leakage and flow rates and subjective difficulty in performance were not significant.

CONCLUSIONS: Suturing time was the only statistically significant difference among the 3 anastomotic techniques, with the lid technique apparently the quickest to perform. Such techniques can be designed to assess microsurgical abilities and help neurosurgery residents in developing countries improve their surgical skills and techniques.

Medical Subject Headings

Anastomosis, Surgical; Cyanoacrylates; Humans; Neurosurgical Procedures; Suture Techniques; Tissue Adhesives

Publication Date

2-1-2020

Publication Title

World Neurosurg

ISSN

1878-8769

Volume

134

First Page

465

Last Page

471

PubMed ID

31734417

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1016/j.wneu.2019.11.054

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