Title

Selective posterior cerebral artery amobarbital test: a predictor of memory following subtemporal selective amygdalohippocampectomy.

Department

Neurosurgery

Document Type

Article

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The selective posterior cerebral artery (PCA) amobarbital test, or PCA Wada test, is used to predict memory impairment after epilepsy surgery in patients who have previously had a failed internal carotid artery (ICA) amobarbital test.

METHODS: Medical records from 2012 to 2018 were retrospectively reviewed for all patients with seizures who underwent a selective PCA Wada test at our institution following a failed or inconclusive ICA Wada test. Standardized neuropsychological testing was performed before and during the Wada procedure and postoperatively in patients who underwent resection.

RESULTS: Thirty-three patients underwent a selective PCA Wada test, with no complications. Twenty-six patients with medically refractory epilepsy had a seizure focus amenable to selective amygdalohippocampectomy (AHE). Six patients (23%, n=26) had a failed PCA Wada test and did not undergo selective AHE, seven (27%) declined surgical resection, leaving 13 patients who underwent subtemporal selective AHE. Hippocampal sclerosis was found in all 13 patients (100%). Twelve patients (92%) subsequently underwent formal neuropsychological testing and all were found to have stable memory. Ten patients (77%) were seizure-free (Engel Class I), with average follow-up of 13 months.

CONCLUSION: The selective PCA Wada test is predictive of memory outcomes after subtemporal selective AHE in patients with a failed or inconclusive ICA Wada test. Furthermore, given the low risk of complications and potential benefit of seizure freedom, a selective PCA Wada test may be warranted in patients with medically intractable epilepsy who are candidates for a selective AHE and who have a prior failed or inconclusive ICA Wada test.

Publication Date

2-1-2020

Publication Title

J Neurointerv Surg

ISSN

1759-8486

Volume

12

Issue

2

First Page

165

Last Page

169

PubMed ID

31320550

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1136/neurintsurg-2019-014984

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