Title

Historical perspectives, challenges, and future directions of implantable brain-computer interfaces for sensorimotor applications

Authors

Santosh Chandrasekaran, Neural Bypass and Brain Computer Interface Laboratory, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Northwell Health, Manhasset, NY, USA.
Matthew Fifer, Research and Exploratory Development Department, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD, USA.
Stephan Bickel, The Human Brain Mapping Laboratory, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Northwell Health, Manhasset, NY, USA.
Luke Osborn, Research and Exploratory Development Department, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD, USA.
Jose Herrero, The Human Brain Mapping Laboratory, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Northwell Health, Manhasset, NY, USA.
Breanne Christie, Research and Exploratory Development Department, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, Laurel, MD, USA.
Junqian Xu, Departments of Radiology and Psychiatry, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA.
Rory K. Murphy, Department of Neurosurgery, Barrow Neurological Institute, St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, AZ, USA.Follow
Sandeep Singh, Good Shepherd Rehabilitation Hospital, Allentown, PA, USA.
Matthew F. Glasser, Departments of Radiology and Neuroscience, Washington University in St Louis, Saint Louis, MO, USA.
Jennifer L. Collinger, Rehabilitation Neural Engineering Labs, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
Robert Gaunt, Rehabilitation Neural Engineering Labs, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
Ashesh D. Mehta, The Human Brain Mapping Laboratory, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Northwell Health, Manhasset, NY, USA.
Andrew Schwartz, McGowan Institute of Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
Chad E. Bouton, Neural Bypass and Brain Computer Interface Laboratory, Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research, Northwell Health, Manhasset, NY, USA. cbouton@northwell.edu.

Document Type

Article

Abstract

Almost 100 years ago experiments involving electrically stimulating and recording from the brain and the body launched new discoveries and debates on how electricity, movement, and thoughts are related. Decades later the development of brain-computer interface technology began, which now targets a wide range of applications. Potential uses include augmentative communication for locked-in patients and restoring sensorimotor function in those who are battling disease or have suffered traumatic injury. Technical and surgical challenges still surround the development of brain-computer technology, however, before it can be widely deployed. In this review we explore these challenges, historical perspectives, and the remarkable achievements of clinical study participants who have bravely forged new paths for future beneficiaries.

Publication Date

9-22-2021

Publication Title

Bioelectronic medicine

E-ISSN

2332-8886

Volume

7

Issue

1

First Page

14

PubMed ID

34548098

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1186/s42234-021-00076-6

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