Title

Association of neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage and cognitive impairment

Authors

Maria Vassilaki, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
Jeremiah A. Aakre, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
Anna Castillo, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
Alanna M. Chamberlain, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
Patrick M. Wilson, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
Walter K. Kremers, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
Michelle M. Mielke, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
Yonas E. Geda, Department of Neurology, Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, Arizona, USA.Follow
Mary M. Machulda, Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
Rabe E. Alhurani, Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
Jonathan Graff-Radford, Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
Prashanthi Vemuri, Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
Val J. Lowe, Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
Clifford R. Jack, Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
David S. Knopman, Department of Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.
Ronald C. Petersen, Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

Document Type

Article

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: We investigated the association of the area deprivation index (ADI) with cognitive decline, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and dementia in older adults (≥50 years old). ADI is a neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage measure assessed at the census block group level. METHODS: The study included 4699 participants, initially without dementia, with available ADI values for 2015 and at least one study visit in 2008 through 2018. Using logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models with age as the time scale, we assessed the odds for MCI and the risk for dementia, respectively. RESULTS: In cognitively unimpaired (CU) adults at baseline, the risk for progression to dementia increased for every decile increase in the ADI state ranking (hazard ratio = 1.06, 95% confidence interval (1.01-1.11), P = .01). Higher ADI values were associated with subtly faster cognitive decline. DISCUSSION: In older CU adults, higher baseline neighborhood socioeconomic deprivation levels were associated with progression to dementia and slightly faster cognitive decline. HIGHLIGHTS: The study used area deprivation index, a composite freely available neighborhood deprivation measure. Higher levels of neighborhood deprivation were associated with greater mild cognitive impairment odds. Higher neighborhood deprivation levels were associated with higher dementia risk.

Publication Date

6-6-2022

Publication Title

Alzheimer's & dementia : the journal of the Alzheimer's Association

E-ISSN

1552-5279

PubMed ID

35666244

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1002/alz.12702

Share

COinS