Title

Solvent exposed occupations and risk of Parkinson disease in Finland

Document Type

Article

Abstract

Introduction: Epidemiologic and toxicology studies suggest that exposure to various solvents, especially chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents, might increase Parkinson disease (PD) risk. Methods: In a population-based case-control study in Finland, we examined whether occupations with potential for solvent exposures were associated with PD. We identified newly diagnosed cases age 45-84 from a nationwide medication reimbursement register in 1995-2014. From the population register, we randomly selected non-PD controls matched on sex, along with birth and diagnosis years (age). We included 11,757 cases and 23,236 controls with an occupation in the 1990 census, corresponding to age 40-60. We focused on 28 occupations with ≥ 5% probability of solvent exposure according to the Finnish Job Exposure Matrix. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by logistic regression modeling, adjusting for age, sex, socioeconomic status, and smoking probability. Results: Similar proportions of cases (5.5%) and controls (5.6%) had an occupation with potential exposure to any solvents. However, all occupations with a point estimate above one, and all significantly or marginally significantly associated with PD (electronic/telecommunications worker [OR = 1.63, 95% CI 1.05-2.50], laboratory assistant [OR = 1.40, 95% CI 0.98-1.99], and machine/engine mechanic [OR = 1.23, 95% CI 0.99-1.52]) entailed potential for exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents, specifically. Secondary analyses indicated exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and some metals might contribute to the association for mechanics. Conclusion: PD risk might be slightly increased in occupations with potential exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbon solvents. Confirmation is required in additional studies that adjust for other occupational exposures and smoking.

Publication Date

1-1-2021

Publication Title

Clinical parkinsonism & related disorders

E-ISSN

2590-1125

Volume

4

First Page

100092

PubMed ID

34316670

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1016/j.prdoa.2021.100092

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