Title

A cross-cultural study on impaired self-awareness in Japanese patients with brain dysfunction

Document Type

Article

Abstract

Japanese patients with brain dysfunction (21 with severe traumatic brain injury [TBI], 21 with right, and 21 with left cerebral vascular accidents [CVA]) were asked to make behavioral ratings regarding their competencies in several areas. Relatives of patients and physical therapists who treated them also rated each patient's behavioral competency. Japanese patients with TBI overestimated their behavioral competencies compared with therapists' ratings, but not relatives' ratings. Japanese patients with TBI overestimated self-care skills but not their ability to interact in socioemotional situations. Patients who had right and left CVA did not differ in their mean ratings of behavioral competency. Among all patient groups, there was no correlation between self-reported competencies and performance on a neuropsychological test, Family ratings of patients' behavioral competencies correlated with the patients' neuropsychological test performance. Post hoc analyses of patients with TBI suggest that speed of finger tapping related to an impaired self-awareness. Whereas cultural factors may influence self-reports of behavioral competency, patients across cultures with brain dysfunction seem to have reduced insight into their actual level of neuropsychological functioning.

Publication Date

5-30-1997

Publication Title

Neuropsychiatry, Neuropsychology and Behavioral Neurology

ISSN

0894878X

Volume

10

Issue

2

First Page

135

Last Page

143

PubMed ID

9150515

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