Title

Neuropsychological outcomes from constant current deep brain stimulation for Parkinson's disease

Document Type

Article

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the neurobehavioral safety of constant-current subthalamic deep brain stimulation and to compare the neuropsychological effects of stimulation versus electrode placement alone. Methods: A total of 136 patients with Parkinson's disease underwent bilateral subthalamic device implantation in this randomized trial. Patients received stimulation either immediately after device implantation (n = 101; active stimulation) or beginning 3 months after surgery (n = 35; delayed activation control). Patients were administered neuropsychological tests before, 3, and 12 months after device implantation. Results: Neuropsychological change in stimulation and control groups were comparable. Within-group analyses revealed declines in category and switching verbal fluency in both groups, but only the stimulation group had letter verbal fluency and Stroop task declines. Depression symptom improvements occurred in both groups, but more often in the stimulation group. Letter fluency declines were associated with worse Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire Communication subscale scores. Baseline and 12-month comparisons (in the combined group) revealed gains in verbal and visual delayed recall scores and improvement in depression symptoms, but decrements in verbal fluency and Stroop scores. Conclusions: Constant-current bilateral subthalamic stimulation had a good cognitive safety profile except for decrements in verbal fluency and on the Stroop task. These abnormalities are related to device implantation, but stimulation likely had an additive effect. One year after surgery, the cognitive changes did not exert a detrimental effect on quality of life, although letter fluency declines were associated with communication dissatisfaction at 12 months. Improvement in depressive symptom severity appears dependent on stimulation and not placebo or lesion effects. © 2016 The Authors. Movement Disorders published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

Publication Date

3-1-2017

Publication Title

Movement Disorders

ISSN

08853185

E-ISSN

15318257

Volume

32

Issue

3

First Page

433

Last Page

440

PubMed ID

27753157

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)

10.1002/mds.26827

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